2019 Recordings


Enterprise Level Live Streaming

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Live streaming has become turn-key and affordable, making it easy for hobbyists to get online with only a few clicks. But easy rarely guarantees high production quality, reliability, or even an audience. Higher education is turning to live streaming in two different verticals: distance learning and events. In both cases, the turn-key solutions out there can prove lacking, especially when you must factor in those elements of production quality and reliability, or obligations such as accessibility. In this presentation we will look at the options available for live streaming, starting at the entry-level consumer options, and advancing through the enterprise-level services available.

Raul Burriel
Streaming Media Coordinator
Oregon State University

Raul has worked on video storage and delivery options over IP networks for over two decades. He has worked at Oregon State University since 2008, where he has been responsible for deploying media solutions for education, and tasked with working with vendors to innovate new solutions related to recording, storage, and delivery of media. Raul is an advocate for the integrated media ecosystem, providing one-stop solutions to students, faculty, and staff.

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Play Games. Become a Leader.

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Games are fun, but they are also a stealthy way to learn. We learn better when we are engaged, and what’s more engaging than having a good time? This session will have you participate in games that can improve the leadership qualities of you and your team members.

Carrie Kyser
Instructional Designer
Lewis-Clark State College

Carrie Kyser joined the e-Learning Services team at Lewis-Clark State College in 2015. She received her Bachelor’s in Landscape Architecture and a Secondary Degree in Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences from Kansas State University. Her passion for technology and life-long learning lead her to become what she calls an “accidental” instructional designer. Carrie is currently pursuing a Masters of Education in Educational Leadership from Idaho State University.

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Getting Your Arms Around the Work:
How a visual workflow tool can help manage projects, tasks, and deadlines.

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Do you feel like you work nonstop, but are never as productive as you’d like to be? Do you feel like you’re constantly switching from one task to another, struggling to focus on one task long enough to make progress? Does your team struggle with communication, causing issues like duplicated efforts, rework, and more? If you’ve answered YES to any of these questions, you aren’t alone. As educational technology professionals and managers, we often struggle to manage the workload and communicate as a team. As a result, we may miss important deadlines, duplicate work efforts, or need to go back and do rework. All because of a lack of organization and communication. In this presentation, I will discuss the basic principles of kanban and give examples of how I use kanban tools to help organize and keep up with tasks, “to-do’s”, and projects in my professional and personal life. Towards the end of the presentation, you will have an opportunity to apply kanban techniques in a hands-on exercise. Sound intriguing? Come to the presentation to learn more.

Mark Cooper
Instructional Technologist/Instructional Designer
Idaho State University

Mark Cooper is an Instructional Technologist who works with faculty to create new online courses and improve upon existing online courses. He has over 14 years of professional work experience as an instructional designer, eLearning developer, and organizational development consultant in the corporate sector and a deep passion for learning and development and principles of instructional design. Mark’s education includes a B.S. in Marketing and an M.B.A. with a focus in Information Technology and Organizational Development from Point Park University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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Get Your Campus on the Map with Google Street View

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The University of Idaho Doceo Center for Innovation + Learning has undertaken a project to provide virtual 360 tours of campus via Google Maps & Google Street View. This session will detail how this process works and logistics for this DIY marketing tool. We will also explain how we involved students, faculty, staff, and administration. We will conclude with next steps which involves use of Google Poly to add narratives, links, images, etc. to tours.

Cassidy Hall
Director
University of Idaho Doceo Center

Cassidy Hall is the director for the Doceo Center for Innovation + Learning and a technology integration specialist for the Center for Excellence in Teaching as well as an assistant professor of learning technologies in the University of Idaho’s Curriculum and Instruction Department. Hall has been working with the Doceo Center for six years and has served as the director for the past four years.  Her research interests include technology integration in both higher ed and K-12 settings such as artificial intelligence in the classroom and technology integration to support students with special needs.

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Promoting Zoom to Support Unique Course Delivery and Virtual Student Support

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Since the University to Idaho officially adopted Zoom two years ago, the need to support and extent of use has grown exponentially. To enhance current course delivery and better support student needs, many are turning to Zoom and a hybrid course delivery. In this session we will share how we support Zoom technology collaboratively through three units on campus: IT including Classroom Technology Services, the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, and the Doceo Center.

Carie Saunders
Instructional Designer
University of Idaho Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning

Carie Saunders has been working as an Instructional Designer at the University of Idaho for 6 years, including 2 years within the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. She has expertise in professional and faculty development, online learning, and tools for student engagement. She previously worked in a corporate university environment as well as leading customized training projects.

Cassidy Hall
Director
University of Idaho Doceo Center

Cassidy Hall is the director for the Doceo Center for Innovation + Learning and a technology integration specialist for the Center for Excellence in Teaching as well as an assistant professor of learning technologies in the University of Idaho’s Curriculum and Instruction Department. Hall has been working with the Doceo Center for six years and has served as the director for the past four years.  Her research interests include technology integration in both higher ed and K-12 settings such as artificial intelligence in the classroom and technology integration to support students with special needs.

Greg Clifford
Manager, Classroom Technology Services
University of Idaho

Greg Clifford has served as the manager of Classroom Technology Services at the University of Idaho since 1996. He manages the group within Information Technology Services that is responsible for supporting classroom technology across campus. Greg’s team installs new classroom technology and supports faculty on using innovative classroom equipment and devices.

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Enhancing student experiences with accessible VR at Central Washington University

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The Multimodal Education Center (MEC), a makerspace funded by the department of Multimodal Learning at CWU, provides a multitude of VR units and experiences to students for no cost, and agnostic of academic department for personal and educational enrichment. We have seen success in our current approach and have a robust road plan for future development based on both technological and academic trends. This presentation will discuss our current implementation, plans for future use, and our considerations for VR/AR access in higher education.

Nat Nickel
Senior Media Technician
Central Washington University

Nat Nickel is a Senior Media Technician for Central Washington University proficient in Unity, VR/AR applications, and other emerging technologies with a background in media production.

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Checking in on Accessibility Checkers: Guiding Faculty in the use of Automated Accessibility Tools

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How does a university accessibility specialist support faculty in the use of automated accessibility checkers? Unable to review, test, and repair all online course content and documents at a university, we need to provide faculty with enough resources to check their own content without overwhelming them.

We will discuss the inspection results of automated testing tools through the lens of instructing faculty in their use. What is the accessibility checker telling us? What are the errors and warnings? What can we ignore? What is the automated tool missing altogether and needs a manual check? We will examine several tools for checking LMS course content, MS Office documents, and PDFs.

Learning Objectives

1. Discuss the pros and cons of using automated checkers to create accessible online course content.
2. Simplify the results of accessibility checkers to better instruct faculty how to use them.
3. Clarify resources for faculty to discern critical accessibility compliance issues through both automated and manual testing.

Takeaways Participants will be better able to advise and support faculty in the use of both automated and manual accessibility testing of online course content.

Justi Echeles
Accessibility and Faculty Development Specialist
Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU)

I joined OHSU’s Teaching and Learning Center in April, 2018 as an Accessibility and Faculty Development Specialist. My role is to support faculty and provide resources to bring online course content to WCAG 2.x Level AA compliance. I come to OHSU with experience as an online course developer. I was also a secondary school teacher of Social Studies and English. Originally from the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York, I lived in several states and countries before finding my permanent home in Portland, Oregon.

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School Insight: How Indiana University Revolutionized 600 Classrooms

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Witness the journey of Indiana University as it sought a lecture capture solution to best address evolving needs of students, faculty, and administration. A close analysis of common pain points, integration achievements, and strategic considerations undertaken to enhance lecture capture capabilities that align with the schools’ mission statement.

Educational institutions are tremendously diverse, varying in terms of class size, pedagogy, physical layout, technical infrastructure, and academic budget. In 2017, Indiana University sought to deploy lecture capture technology in all of its classrooms, searching for a single, end-to-end, low-cost lecture capture solution to fit infrastructure needs and allow for easy growth over time.

The session opens with a first-hand account of Indiana University’s reassessment of their previous lecture capture workflow, including analysis of its limitations: proprietary system with narrow customizability; operational challenges of multi-piece platform; costly maintenance; and less-than-ideal video quality affecting viewing experience (10 minutes).

It then outlines the checklist of needs required for selection of a video management system (VMS), plus consideration and selection of a compatible lecture-capture hardware appliance. The practical analysis will examine the centralized lecture capture system offered by Kaltura and Matrox, which facilitates the creation, management, and distribution of video assets under one familiar user interface (15 minutes).

Key questions will engage the audience in assessing their unique considerations for students (e.g., video-on-demand [VOD] options, customizable layouts) and administrators (e.g., centralized monitoring, scheduling capabilities, automated file transfers), focusing on ease of use as a priority for all stakeholders (IT administrators, professors, students) (10 minutes).

It concludes with a succinct takeaway of pain points, integration experience, and deployment successes experienced by Indiana University—a typical lecture-capture installation—and a call to action concerning lecture capture and its impact on next-generation classroom environments, and further Q&A opportunities, as required (10 minutes).

James McGookey
Manager of Collaboration Technologies and Classroom Support
Indiana University

Manager of Collaboration Technologies and Classroom Support at Indiana University, James directs the university’s efforts for video management, lecture capture, and supporting technologies in classrooms. At James’ behest, Indiana University adopted a comprehensive video management solution with accessibility as a cornerstone, dramatically improving students’ ability to experience online videos. A Kelley School of Business graduate, James began his career in the field of broadcasting, soon rising to manager of IT for Indiana University’s radio and television operations. As videos moved online, James took on new roles designing video applications and developing strategies for digital collaboration, focused on building active learning spaces to support a variety of pedagogical strategies.

Franscesco Scartozzi
Director of Matrox Video Products Group

Matrox

Director of Matrox Video Products Group, Francesco has 20+ years’ experience presenting video industry trends, insight, and technological developments in academic facilities. He works closely with research and development teams at Matrox to advance innovative solutions to best meet the myriad needs of educational markets. Experienced in working directly with universities to assess learning workflows, Francesco has gained a keen understanding of where the classroom of the future is headed, with key strategies to optimize the digital learning experience. An accomplished presenter, Franc has hosted numerous webinars, interviews, and training sessions both domestically and abroad.

Darren Stahl
Senior Director of Sales
Kaltura, Inc

Darren has spent more than 15 years helping top academic institutions and Fortune 500 companies solve key challenges using market-leading video technologies. He leads a team of passionate experts dedicated to making learning opportunities more interactive, engaging, and accessible via a flexible video platform. Recognizing the democratizing power of video to impact the way individuals and organizations communicate, collaborate, work, learn, and entertain, Darren strives to revolutionize the video experience by making seamless, integrated video distribution the way of the future.

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Transforming Classroom Experiences with the Active Learning Studio

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Exploring a Use Case: In 2018, Texas A&M University opened the Zachry Engineering Education Complex to offer students and instructors a state-of-the-art learning environment. The Zachry Complex features 32 active learning studios to support more than 20,000 students across 14 departments, while also connecting satellite students and instructors for remote/distance learning.
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In the fall of 2018, 46 years after the opening of the original Zachry Engineering Building at Texas A&M University, the Zachry Engineering Education Complex opened its doors to offer undergraduate students the most modern learning environment on campus. There are no lecture halls, but instead 18, 100-person active learning studios and 14, 50-person active learning studios, supporting over 20,000 students across 14 departments.

So, what exactly is an active learning studio? As students step inside an active learning studio, instead of desks, the Zachry learning studios offer technology worktables with wireless connectivity and multi-device sharing screens. Each worktable accommodates up to four students and all of their devices.

The rooms are designed to support all teaching styles from traditional lecture to team problem-solving oriented sections. Imagine the ability to teach from anywhere in the room, while using and controlling technology to share and distribute content throughout the room. Faculty teach among their students, engaging with them and displaying their teaching resources across several big screens, as well as onto the learning table screens via their tablet or the main teaching station.

The solution also connects instructors and students in satellite campuses, providing an alternative to remote and distance learning. Now, classes can video conference between rooms in a building or with people around the globe.

Join us in a presentation around our active learning room technology: how it’s creating new ways for instructors and students to connect, share, and learn, and how it’s redefining the classroom experience. You’ll hear from a stakeholders at Texas A&M University who identified, vetted, tested, qualified, and deployed the active learning technology used throughout the state-of-the-art Zachry Complex, and T1V, the organization behind the collaboration technology. Learn how this software-based AV solution has reduced hardware and networking requirements, while delivering more functionality than ever before.

Mark Henry
Senior IT Professional
Texas A&M College of Engineering

Mark Henry has been part of several innovative IT strategies since starting in 1999 in the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University including VDI, classroom and computer lab design, faculty recording studio development. Mark continues various innovative projects for the college dealing with learning technologies. In this capacity, he has helped develop various partnerships with industry and has been part of bringing about new products with these partners. This focus will influence over 19,000 students across a diverse area of Texas through remote and local teaching initiatives.

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Building UNLV’s Enterprise AV/IT system

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Presented will be the history and the process Classroom Technology Services followed establishing an effective deployment of the room monitoring system at UNLV. The basic of the design, priorities and deployment of the hardware will be covered then we will move to the applications and programming connecting the campus classrooms. In conclusion, you will be shown samples using the data collected to calculate the return on investment, making smart technology decisions based on numbers, and to identify trends in utilization of the technology. This was a 5-year endeavor creating and documenting our technology enhanced environment.

Scott Menter
Manager, Classroom Technology Services
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Scott Menter is currently in his 8th year as Manager of Classroom Technology Services at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. Classroom Technology Services is part of Instructional Technology Services under the Office of Information Technology. Prior to UNLV, he worked for Louisiana State University managing their Distance Education suites and Classroom Technology, worked Louisiana Department of Education Center for Educational Technology as an Educational Technology Consultant, and Louisiana School for the Deaf as their Media Specialist. Altogether, Scott has been working with AV technology and Education since 1986. Scott has experienced the evolution of educational technology first hand. Scott currently holds BS in Vocational Education from LSU, AVIXA CTS and Crestron DMC-E-4K certifications.

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Technology Design In Active Learning Classrooms – Key Elements To Consider

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AV technology is an essential component in flexible, advanced active learning classrooms. Dig into strategies for planning these environments and learn about the pitfalls to avoid.

Michael Fornander
CEO
Neurilink

Michael Fornander is CEO and Co-Founder of Neurilink, a growing AV design and integration company focused on serving organizations throughout the Northwest. Fornander has over 20 years’ experience in AV including video conferencing and infrastructure solutions, audiovisual design, consulting, and integration, interactive technologies, as well as other technology rich collaborative systems. Fornander acquired his BA from Washington State University in Elementary Education, as well as his Master of Science in Educational Technologies from Boise State University.

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Knocking Down the Classroom Walls

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Imagine a class without a room. Not in a “It’s sunny so we’re having class on the quad” way, but in a way that fundamentally reformulates the way class is taught. What if students in a class had access to independent study areas, multiple whiteboards, wireless projections, a lightboard studio, a speech lab, a makerspace, a video conference facility, living room seating, and more all as part of their scheduled class space? Would that change the way you or your faculty taught your subject matter? As it turns out, the borderless classroom already exists at Carroll College as part of the Simperman Learning Commons, a transformative initiative with the goal of revitalizing Carroll’s library space and putting learning on display to encourage interdisciplinary thinking. Come see what happened when we pushed our classes outside of the classroom box.

Ryan D Hazen
Instructional Technologist
Carroll College

Ryan is an Moodle administrator, classroom designer, A/V technician, and instructional coach. He has presented on technology, teaching, and innovation at various conferences across the US. He is an instructional technologist at Carroll College and a former director of NWMET. He is also Chief Mootineer of the MountainMoot.

Dan Case
Director of Academic Technology
Carroll College

Dan has been an academic technology specialist, classroom designer, and A/V technician in higher education for over a decade. He is the mind behind the innovative Sandbox classroom and a former member of the NWMET board of directors. He has presented at conferences all over the US, and is currently on the EdSpaces Education Advisory group. He is also Chief Mootineer of the MountainMoot.

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Increasing Inclusivity through UDL and EdTech Solutions, Including Overcoming Administrator and Instructor Reluctance

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Advances in educational technology have provided the means to make education more accessible to all learners. Traditionally, academic inclusivity was reactive and focused on identifying solutions for the individual with disabilities, primarily in order to meet ADA regulations. In recent years, technology has removed many of the barriers that existed in the traditional learning environment. Using a wide range of constantly evolving tools within the context of the principles of Universal Design for Learning allows us to shift the focus away from designing for the individual with identified disabilities to reducing barriers for all. The student sick with the flu cannot attend class but may watch a livestreamed lecture, and traveling student athletes can keep up with classes through the learning management system.

Despite these advantages, EdTech managers often encounter reluctance to integrating these tools. College administrators and instructors may fear that increasing inclusivity will dilute their brand and compromise academic standards. Instructors often cite concerns about potential loss of intellectual property through digital proliferation. Educating teachers and administrators about educational technology can alleviate concerns. Helping teachers see technology in the context of newer teaching methods such as flipped and blended classrooms can help them to envision an improved teaching experience. Presenting these tools as a method of finding holistic rather than individual solutions helps administrators see that they are cost effective and easy to adopt.

Joshua Kaufman
EdTech Researcher
Tufts University

Josh Kaufman has worked in AV and educational technology for over a decade. He has worked at several colleges and universities around the Boston area in both event and classroom support, and as supervisor of technical operations. He currently works as a researcher at Tufts University. He has a master’s degree in instructional design as well as graduate certificates in instructional technology. A major focus of his work has been to advocate for increased use of audiovisual technology in the classroom, with a special focus on increasing accessibility.

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Accessibility 101: An Online Experiment in Accessibility Basics Training

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Basic accessibility in content we create offers a myriad of benefits to users of the content, including making it available to users of accessible technology and adding compliance to legal requirement at institution, state and national level. Is this training for anyone? The answer is yes! It supports the creation of accessible public or shared content by faculty and staff, it brings benefits to students who have faculty-created content that is ready to use, most of the time without the need for accommodations, and it helps students in turn learn skills sought by employers to maximize the user experience. One of the stumbling blocks is getting people to the training. Workshops are not as well attended as they once were. Solution, fully online training. Enter Canvas Five Day Accessibility Workout and Accessibility 101: Principles of Accessible Design. In this presentation we’ll go over this experiment we run at University of Washington Bothell as well as other strategies to raise the level of digital literacy in our faculty and staff.

Ana Thompson
Learning & Access Designer
University of Washington Bothell – Office of Digital Learning & Innovation

Ana Thompson has worked in higher education for the last 16 years in the areas of IT, digital/online learning strategic planning, instructional design, and as affiliate faculty. As the Learning & Access Designer at the UW Bothell Office of Digital Learning & Innovation, Ana enjoys working with faculty members, deans and staff to streamline the use of technology tools and promote digital fluency. Ana has extensive experience with Learning Management Systems (LMS), adult learning, WCAG 2.1, document accessibility, Copyright and Fair Use, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Universal Design for Instruction (UDI), and finding innovative ways to use old and new tools. Currently, she is the lead of the Universal Design for Active Learning (UDAL) campus initiative, chairs the Campus Accessibility Plan efforts, and represents Bothell in the UW IT Accessibility Tri-Campus Task Force. Ana is an Adobe PDF Accessibility Trainer and an IAAP Certified Professional in Accessibility Core Competencies (CPACC).

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Changing Perspectives to Innovate in Collaboration, Accessibility and Teaching and Learning

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A commonly heard buzzword in higher education is innovation. But what does innovation look like? What is the purpose of innovation? In reality, innovative practices may have nothing to do with technology. Instead, innovation may simply involve a shift in thinking, a new collaboration, a new perspective. In this session, we’ll look at how shifting our thinking on a project to update general classrooms and a student lab helped to promote collaboration, accessibility and the opportunity for more teaching and learning innovation.

In this session participants will:
·· Examine how new collaborations fostered new perspectives
·· Identify how to create innovative spaces within a tight budget
·· Explore practical applications of innovations in teaching, learning and administrative environments

Ana Thompson
Learning & Access Designer
University of Washington Bothell – Office of Digital Learning & Innovation

Ana Thompson has worked in higher education for the last 16 years in the areas of IT, digital/online learning strategic planning, instructional design, and as affiliate faculty. As the Learning & Access Designer at the UW Bothell Office of Digital Learning & Innovation, Ana enjoys working with faculty members, deans and staff to streamline the use of technology tools and promote digital fluency. Ana has extensive experience with Learning Management Systems (LMS), adult learning, WCAG 2.1, document accessibility, Copyright and Fair Use, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Universal Design for Instruction (UDI), and finding innovative ways to use old and new tools. Currently, she is the lead of the Universal Design for Active Learning (UDAL) campus initiative, chairs the Campus Accessibility Plan efforts, and represents Bothell in the UW IT Accessibility Tri-Campus Task Force. Ana is an Adobe PDF Accessibility Trainer and an IAAP Certified Professional in Accessibility Core Competencies (CPACC).

Salem Levesque
Digital Learning Specialist
University of Washington Bothell – Office of Digital Learning & Innovation

Salem Levesque joined the Learning Technologies team in 2012 to develop digital media pedagogy and learning technologies support at UW Bothell. His roles have expanded greatly, over his tenure, and is now affiliate faculty in the Nursing and Health Studies and as a liaison for the Interactive Media Design program. He has presented in a number of conferences over the past few years; Educause Connect and Managers of Educational Technology Conference to name just a few. With many years of multimedia and IT experience, Salem invest his time and energy into the Digital Media Lab (UW2 -121) and the Open Learning Lab (UW2-140) by offering open and honest learning environments. He also continues to expand the opportunities for students, faculty, and staff interested in multimedia or learning with technology.

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Fostering New Modes of Learning and Research Through Library Space Design

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The Department of Knowledge Production was created by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas University Libraries in 2017 to develop new spaces and services that support emerging research and teaching needs on campus. In the same year, members of the Department of Knowledge Production and campus stakeholders embarked on a two-year, multi-phased renovation project to design new learning and research spaces in the main library on campus. In this session, the presenter will first discuss the evolution of the Department of Knowledge Production to create services as the intersection of research, pedagogy, and technology, and then describe the process for designing the learning spaces in collaboration with faculty, students, and campus partners. Finally, the presenter will share how these spaces and services can enable new pathways for a diverse community of scholars to explore and expand the possibilities for learning and research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

John Watts
Head of Knowledge Production
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

John Watts is the Head of Knowledge Production at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries where he leads a team at the junction of technology, pedagogy, and scholarly communication to empower students and faculty as knowledge creators. He presents and publishes on the topics of creativity in information literacy instruction, student learning outcomes assessment, and peer-assisted learning in academic libraries.

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Voice Control of a Classroom AV System

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A proof of concept project at Utah State University enables voice control of an existing classroom AV system by a smart speaker device, the Amazon Echo. Our project was designed and implemented to scale and provide an accessible user interface for a visually impaired instructor to easily control a classroom AV system. Our project’s second stage, utilizing the new features of Alexa for Business allows us to scale, manage and deploy smart speakers as needed across campus. Standardization of control system programming allows rapid deployment and enabling of voice control features in any classroom.
This case study will detail the planning and implementation of the project.

Jim Wellings
Senior Systems Designer/Programmer
Utah State University

Jim Wellings is a senior classroom and AV systems designer and programmer at Utah State University. He started his career in technical theatre, specializing in lighting design, media, and live audio. Entertainment production still influences his approach to all AV and media, and years of live sound mixing has lowered his tolerance for bad audio, much to the occasional rolled eye of coworkers. Incorporating best practices from video production, systems design, and entertainment production in the design of AV systems is part of his toolset when creating an experience for learners and instructors. In addition to being a full time AV nerd, in his spare time he engineers live sound and freelances in broadcast television production.

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“Reframing” Lecture Capture Implementation

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When faculty hear “lecture capture”, they tend to think “it can only be done live in the classroom” and “my students will never come to class again”. Like a good counseling session, UNLV’s strategy for lecture capture implementation re-frames the thought process for faculty. This presentation will highlight strategies for helping faculty recognize lecture capture as a helpful student tool, starting from their own offices, along with strategies for maximizing lecture capture automation.

Andy Borts
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Instructional Technology Support Specialist

Andy has worked with the Office of Information Technology at UNLV for one year. His current role involves supporting video conferencing, lecture capture, and audience response systems for faculty, staff, and students. He previously worked at Westminster College in New Wilmington, PA from 2010-2018 as the Classroom and Event Technology Specialist. He has a Bachelors Degree from Westminster in Broadcast Communications and will be receiving his Masters of Education degree in May. When he is not geeking out over technology, you’ll find Andy at the golf course, casino, bowling alley, camping, or watching his Cleveland Browns attempting to make the playoffs.

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Improving the Student Experience with Data

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We explore 3 areas in which higher education institutions can improve the student experience: Student Success, Student-Centered Institution, and Data-Enabled institution. Utilizing customer examples, we share best practices to help colleges/universities improve their technology on campus to help aid students in their educational journeys and achieve their desired outcome: GRADUATION.

Jeremy Sedrick
Head of Sales
LabStats

Jeremy comes with over 20 years of technology sales and leadership. With an Information Technology degree from Colorado State University, he has a thorough understanding of IT needs and wants. Over the course of his career he has worked for Apple, AT&T, CenturyLink, other large companies helping organizations right-size their technology needs. His consultative approach has helped organizations uncover budgets, increase user engagement, and enhance business needs. At LabStats he has led his teams to help institutions reduce hardware/software expenses, increase student satisfaction, and provide tools to ensure organizations can provide concrete information for data-driven decisions.

When not working, Jeremy loves spending time with is family skiing, boating, hiking, camping, and anything else that involves the great outdoors.

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Partnering For Success

Leading the market throughout history has helped Crestron give Universities tried and true solutions to their most complicated AV problems. The future of technology is strong and Crestron is leading the way once again. We will discuss new technologies and ideas on implementation, how schools have found success through Crestron’s A+ partnership, what that partnership means in terms of training and the path we can provide for schools to become self sufficient, which is the key to success.

Jordan Scales
Regional Sales Manager, Education
Crestron

Jordan Scales has been involved in many facets of the industry from installation, design, engineering and programming for over ten years. Graduating from the Conservatory of Recording Arts and Sciences with a degree in Audio Engineering he quickly found a home in the AV industry where he earned multiple certifications including Crestron’s Master Programmer Certification. Jordan has a passion for technology and finds himself spending most of his free time exploring new technologies and how to better implement them, or in other words; playing with gear.

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Integrating Cloud-based Mobile Augmented Reality into your Devices in the Classroom

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Virtual and Augmented Reality has made huge strides in the past few years, and is now finally ready for wide-scale adoption among many industries, including education. AR/VR in the classroom will change the way students learn concepts and present their ideas.

In this talk, learn about (1) the different hardware and software that are available for Augmented Reality today, (2) how to roll out highly accessible and scalable AR/VR solutions, and (3) how to be ready for the future as the AR/VR technology matures.

Lashan Dias
CEO, Co-Founder
Solidhaus, Inc.

Lashan Dias is the CEO and co-founder of Solidhaus, an enterprise cloud-based AR platform — featured in Apple’s “AR Apps We Love”. His experience ranges from product strategy, enterprise software, and disruptive technology. Follow him on Twitter for the latest in #SpatialComputing: @lashandias

Kevin Duong-Tran
CTO, Co-Founder
Solidhaus, Inc.

Kevin Duong-Tran, CTO and co-founder of Solidhaus, has technology background beginning in video game developer and expanded to SaaS products to enterprise software. His experience has allowed him to consult with industry leaders in education, architecture, and engineering. Kevin provides them with the best means to tell their stories.

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